notes from an urban hibernation

Paris : Simon Cutts & Erica Van Horn

New Vocabulary : Perce – Neige

Perce-neige is the French for snowdrop. I had been feeling sad that the great swathes of snowdrops in the grass at home were blossoming without me to see and enjoy them. I know that they do not need me, but I do feel that I need them. A friend sent photos from Tipperary which just made me feel even more far away from nature. There are loads of flowers in the city but so far I have seen no snowdrops. Or maybe I have not looked in the right places.

Anne and Pierre arrived on Monday with this small and perfect offering from their garden. They could not have known I was missing my own snowdrops. Perhaps they just know that anyone who has ever lived with the surprise of snowdrops in January must be missing them. The name Perce-neige is explained by the fact that the plant pierces its way up through the snow. It pierces a hole in the snow. I did not hear the name properly at first. I heard it more like personage, which was way off. I think my ear is made of wood. I just do not hear things correctly and as soon as I think I am getting better at listening and understanding, I make another great error.

Since learning Perce-neige, I have been reminded of the American Indian tribe, the Nez Perce.
Of course, I starting out remembering them as the Perce Nez which is another bit of wooden ear in action. I had to look them up to get the name right. They are located in Idaho. With or without snowdrops.

EVH

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This entry was posted on January 31, 2018 by .
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